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Google turn-by-turn directions? [Google Maps Navigation]  (View post)

DPic [PersonRank 10]

Tuesday, October 27, 2009
10 years ago7,491 views

forbes.com/2009/10/23/android- ...

So...why is this news? Correct me if i'm wrong but i thought it has been known for a while that Google wanted to add navigation to the Google Maps apps-- i don't have a link though

BizAbh [PersonRank 10]

10 years ago #

[Moved from "Google developing free navigation app?" – Tony]

According to Forbes, various navigation service companies suspect [and fear] that a free voice-guided, real-time, turn-by-turn navigation app by Google is in the works. These companies believe ad-support would make it possible for the application to be free. Google has a lot of experience in that department, since it already put ads on the iPhone map application, which it helped build.

   Of course, this kind of rumor is nothing new, as people have been speculating that Google would create a free navigator ever since Google Maps was introduced on mobile phones. However, Google has all the pieces needed now, it just has to put them together. The rise in popularity of Android and Google Maps are fueling this story even more. And that’s why all the navigation service companies are worried.

Source: erictric.com/technology/rumor- ...

Ionut Alex. Chitu [PersonRank 10]

10 years ago #

So the entire article is based on a hunch? "The companies, which provide voice-guided, real-time, turn-by-turn driving directions on people's cellphones, have a hunch that Google is developing a mobile navigation application that it plans to give away for free."

Ionut Alex. Chitu [PersonRank 10]

10 years ago #

"Today we're excited to announce the next step for Google Maps for mobile: Google Maps Navigation (Beta) for Android 2.0 devices.

This new feature comes with everything you'd expect to find in a GPS navigation system, like 3D views, turn-by-turn voice guidance and automatic rerouting. But unlike most navigation systems, Google Maps Navigation was built from the ground up to take advantage of your phone's Internet connection.

The first phone to have Google Maps Navigation and Android 2.0 is the Droid from Verizon. Google Maps Navigation is initially available in the United States. And like other Google Maps features, Navigation is free. "

googleblog.blogspot.com/2009/1 ...

Roger Browne [PersonRank 10]

10 years ago #

> turn-by-turn voice guidance ...
> ad-support would make it possible for the application to be free

I can see it now. Turn by turn voice guidance with ads:

"Turn left in 100 feet. Feeling hungry? Turn right into McDonald's car park in 50 feet. Oh, not hungry. Petrol low? There's a Shell entrance on the left in 100 feet. You selected "Best Western Hotel" as your destination. Did you perhaps mean "Holiday Inn", where there is a special offer this evening?"

mbegin [PersonRank 10]

10 years ago #

Guess it was a good hunch :) Hope it's available on the iPhone soon!

hebbet [PersonRank 10]

10 years ago #

apple will block it: "There is a navigation in maps"

mbegin [PersonRank 10]

10 years ago #

This Street View mode and satellite mode will be way cool...


google.com/mobile/images/navig ...




google.com/mobile/images/navig ...



google.com/mobile/navigation/i ...

mbegin [PersonRank 10]

10 years ago #

Cool stuff... this is from the official blog post:

<< Here are seven features that are possible because Google Maps Navigation is connected to the Internet:

The most recent map and business data
When you use Google Maps Navigation, your phone automatically gets the most up-to-date maps and business listings from Google Maps — you never need to buy map upgrades or update your device. And this data is continuously improving, thanks to users who report maps issues and businesses who activate their listings with Google Local Business Center.

Search in plain English
Google Maps Navigation brings the speed, power and simplicity of Google search to your car. If you don't know the address you're looking for, don't worry. Simply enter the name of a business, a landmark or just about anything into the search box, and Google will find it for you. Then press "Navigate", and you're on your way.

Search by voice
Typing on a phone can be difficult, especially in the car, so with Google Maps Navigation, you can say your destination instead. Hold down the search button to activate voice search, then tell your phone what you want to do (like "Navigate to Pike Place in Seattle"), and navigation will start automatically.

Traffic view
Google Maps Navigation gets live traffic data over the Internet. A traffic indicator light in the corner of the screen glows green, yellow or red, depending on the current traffic conditions along your route. If there's a jam ahead of you, you'll know. To get more details, tap the light to zoom out to an aerial view showing traffic speeds and incidents ahead. And if the traffic doesn't look good, you can choose an alternate route.

Search along route
For those times when you're already on the road and need to find a business, Google Maps Navigation searches along your route to give you results that won't take you far from your path. You can search for a specific business by name or by type, or you can turn on popular layers, such as gas stations, restaurants or parking.

Satellite view
Google Maps Navigation uses the same satellite imagery as Google Maps on the desktop to help you get to your destination. Turn on the satellite layer for a high-resolution, 3D view of your upcoming route. Besides looking cool, satellite view can help you make sense of complicated maneuvers.

Street View
If you want to know what your next turn looks like, double-tap the map to zoom into Street View, which shows the turn as you'll see it, with your route overlaid. And since locating an address can sometimes be tricky, we'll show you a picture of your destination as you approach the end of your route, so you'll know exactly what to look for. >>

TOMHTML [PersonRank 10]

10 years ago #

You have to drive in an covered by mobile networks. I can't imagine how much money you will spend with that.

WebSonic.nl [PersonRank 10]

10 years ago #

[Moved from "Google Maps Navigation" – Tony]

<<Google Maps Navigation is an internet-connected GPS navigation system with voice guidance. It is part of Google Maps for mobile and is available for phones with Android 2.0.

Google Maps Navigation uses your phone's internet connection to give you the latest maps and business data. But that's not all that's different about Google's approach to GPS navigation. Watch the below video to learn more.>>

google.com/mobile/navigation/i ...

The official post:
googleblog.blogspot.com/2009/1 ...

SE [PersonRank 2]

10 years ago #

Any examples of "voice guidance" on Youtube? I didn't see any in Google's video.

Juha-Matti Laurio [PersonRank 10]

10 years ago #

Also

+ Show video

Juha-Matti Laurio [PersonRank 10]

10 years ago #

And at
google-latlong.blogspot.com/20 ...

Juha-Matti Laurio [PersonRank 10]

10 years ago #

From the entry:

""Today we're announcing the beta launch of Google Maps Navigation, an internet-connected GPS navigation system with voice guidance and automatic rerouting, as a feature of Google Maps on phones that run Android 2.0. Google Maps Navigation isn't like the GPS systems you might be used to – it was built from the ground up to use Google Maps services over your phone's internet connection.
...."

Above 15 comments were made in the forum before this was blogged,

Nick [PersonRank 0]

10 years ago #

Interesting. Watch out Tom Tom

[signature removed]

Trogdor [PersonRank 6]

10 years ago #

Another thing to bear in mind – thanks to these phones, users are providing traffic data back to the mobile carriers (and perhaps Google).

How? By tower triangulation, your carrier knows where you are. If you're on a city street, your carrier knows how fast you're moving. Let's say 10% of drivers on a major highway in downtown Houston have Verizon phones, not talking, but simply turned on. Since these phones maintain a constant connection to the nearest tower(s), Verizon can tell how fast these customers are moving on this highway, and therefore get a decent idea of how heavy traffic is in that area. Combine this with historical data, and Verizon can give a decent answer for what traffic is now, and what it will be soon.

Open question: the mobile-phone carriers can do this. Can Google? How long before the mobile-phone carriers start selling this aggregate real-time real-world traffic data to Google, Yahoo, Bing, not to mention local governments? Are they already doing this?

BizAbh [PersonRank 10]

10 years ago #

[put at-character here]Trogdor u really make a Good Point . so efficiency comes at the cost of Privacy .

mbegin [PersonRank 10]

10 years ago #

>> Open question: the mobile-phone carriers can do this. Can Google?

Yes, Google can:

<< When you choose to enable Google Maps with My Location, your phone sends anonymous bits of data back to Google describing how fast you're moving. When we combine your speed with the speed of other phones on the road, across thousands of phones moving around a city at any given time, we can get a pretty good picture of live traffic conditions. >>

googleblog.blogspot.com/2009/0 ...

Jérôme Flipo [PersonRank 10]

10 years ago #

Talking about Maps...


mcwetboy.net/maproom/images/ma ...

Trogdor [PersonRank 6]

10 years ago #

[put at-character here]BizAbh – thanks for the link. Clearly I wasn't the first to think of it, and they've already implemented it.

Here's another way this setup helps Google and hurts the alternatives – crowdsourced feedback. Google gives you turn-by-turn directions, and then Google sees which aspects of those directions you follow, and which ones you choose to ignore. Again, with enough usage over time, this gives Google feedback about how good or bad their directions are, and helps them to improve their algorithms.

Companies that sell static GPS units – unable to call back home whenever the driver deviates from the original plan – are at a big disadvantage in this way.

/pd [PersonRank 10]

10 years ago #

Actually having GPS in the country side is much better then not having a connection/ Cell tower for your mobile device. Mobile device work well within proxomity of a cell towe, but once you go offroad.. with no connection to a celltower on litterally gets lost!!

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