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Doodle Pierre de Fermat

WebSonic.nl [PersonRank 10]

Tuesday, August 16, 2011
2 years ago7,154 views


google.co.nz/logos/2011/pierre ...



Alt text is: I have discovered a truly marvelous proof of this theorem, which this doodle is too small to contain.

Moses [PersonRank 0]

2 years ago #

;D

rajasundar [PersonRank 0]

2 years ago #

how?

Juha-Matti Laurio [PersonRank 10]

2 years ago #

Triggers
google.com/#q=Pierre+de+Fermat ...

on Google . com today.

Conrad N [PersonRank 0]

2 years ago #

This documentary will explain why the doodle is too small to prove Fermat's Last Theorem.

topdocumentaryfilms.com/fermat ...

Bill M [PersonRank 0]

2 years ago #

Matt Damon would know.

Edward R [PersonRank 0]

2 years ago #

The formula is correct because
X^N+Y^N does not = Z^N where N>2 but it is also true that
X^N+Y^N does not = Z^N where N<1

with the proviso always that X Y and Z are all integers.

Buzz Hickok [PersonRank 0]

2 years ago #

I agree with Edward R since N>2 and it can also be N<2

Hannah V [PersonRank 0]

2 years ago #

Yeah I don't know why people think it would work with n=1. The formula is where X and Y are legs and Z is the hypotenuse of a triangle. So the example 3^1 + 2^1 = 5^1 is obviously wrong because the legs of a triangle can't equal the hypotenuse.

Barry in Belmont [PersonRank 1]

2 years ago #

Fermat's Last Theorem really has nothing to do with the legs and hypotenuse of a right triangle. Certainly, in the special case where N=2, then it becomes the Pythagorean Theorem, and the equation holds true for all integer values of X, Y and Z. However, when N is anything but 2, the equation is an inequality, and is more of a mathematical abstraction, and is not directly applicable to 'real' things, such as triangles.

Dave L. [PersonRank 0]

2 years ago #

Pythagorean theorem states that X^2+Y^2=Z^2. That is all that it states. This fact does not necessarily mean that powers other than 2 would not also be equal.

It would require a little more proof than simply comparing this to the pythagorean theorem to determine if the statement is valid or not.

Stacy Clark [PersonRank 0]

2 years ago #

Fermat's Theorem and mathematics are a side plot in "The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest" by Stieg Larsson. Lisbeth Salander is trying to work out the proof herself without looking it up.

John Merklinghaus [PersonRank 1]

2 years ago #

Some examples that deserve consideration...

12^1 + 17^1 = 29^1
12^7 + 0^7 = 12^7

Barry in Belmont [PersonRank 1]

2 years ago #

Sorry, John, those examples do NOT deserve consideration. Fermat's Last
Theorem specifically states that no three positive integers x, y, and z can satisfy the equation x^n + y^n = z^n for any integer value of n > 2. In your first example n=1, so it doesn't count, and in your second example y=0, so it doesn't count.

John Merklinghaus [PersonRank 1]

2 years ago #

I agree, Barry, but some people are saying simple for cases of n=/=2, and the Doodle fails to specify positive integers.

d santos [PersonRank 1]

2 years ago #

does anyone know anyting about a more general case:
(the minimum number of monomials in each case?)

for example:

x^5 + y^5 + z^5 + .... = n^5

d santos [PersonRank 1]

2 years ago #

the real thing now is to find the minimum number of such monomials.

John Merklinghaus [PersonRank 1]

2 years ago #

Santos, that would be an extension of Fermat's Last Theorum, which has only recently been proven. So, no, I don't think anyone does.

d johnson [PersonRank 0]

2 years ago #

It is true that the doodle does not specify positive integers. But many of the posts regarding the Pythagorean theorem do not specify that the statement is only true if x, y, and z are sides of a right triangle, with z being the hypotenuse. If z is the longest side of a triangle, and x^2 + y^2 < z^2, then the triangle is obtuse; and if z is the longest side, and x^2 + y^2 > z^2, then the triangle is acute. These are all based on angles of the triangle, particularly the angle measure opposite the longest side.

"Pythagorean relationships" are found in many areas of mathematics.

Juha-Matti Laurio [PersonRank 10]

2 years ago #

I agree with Moses =)

Juha-Matti Laurio [PersonRank 10]

2 years ago #

It's not in the directory google.com/logos/

BTW..

This thread is locked as it's old... but you can create a new thread in the forum. 

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