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Why We Trust Google (German Audio)  (View post)

/pd [PersonRank 10]

Sunday, May 14, 2006
14 years ago6,738 views

>>think they’re using the light side of the force, and the dark side of the force must be somewhere else.

I would certinaly think so – else I would not be using Google for most of my services :)--

The Dark side is all around you, if you not using Google!!

tom [PersonRank 0]

14 years ago #

I seem to recall Google being the only big email/search provider who stood up to the US government when they were asked to hand over statistical data.

Seth Finkelstein [PersonRank 10]

14 years ago #

tom: Ouch ouch ouch

The Google Search Subpoena in Perspective
blogoscoped.com/archive/2006-0 ...

Jürgen Starek [PersonRank 1]

14 years ago #

Well, as correct as these thoughts are: Does it improve the situation to use lots of services instead of focusing entirely on Google? I doubt it. Basically every useful web service collects data about you. Suppose you use a different search engine every day, create mail accounts with three unrelated providers and so on. That does spread your data across providers, true. But as todays web companies are often based in the US, all are subject to the same laws...

So if you're really paranoid, prepare to do a lot of research before using web services. Otherwise, don't be evil :-)

Seth Finkelstein [PersonRank 10]

14 years ago #

Actually, I think there's an advantage of spreading the data – the more companies involved, the more there's a chance that someone at one company will blow the whistle on any abuse in violation the law.

It's not a huge advantage, but it does seem to make sense.

Fireheart [PersonRank 1]

14 years ago #

I think there's another special reason people trust Google: It emerged right from geekness, and it never ever (hm, am I right about this???) charged the user for it's services. That creates the weird picture that Google is something more underground, for-the-people thing than e.g. Microsoft.

Fireheart [PersonRank 1]

14 years ago #

...and yet another thing: Just think of the widespread use of payback-cards. The average person seems to lack any hesitation to sell data about their buying habits for maybe 1% disc.
People just don't realize that there could be any threat involved. I even have difficulties to explain it to some, as if they were actively reluctant and blocking the info. Hm... could be a really interesting subject for a psychological study....

Sri [PersonRank 1]

14 years ago #

hmm...scared me first...soon realized being in networked world, it's uncommon to say I am alone and no one is looking at me...Remember the Yahoo/ China case...Our mail has complete trace.
I feel Google built trust by letting you solve your problems...rather I should put help you search solutions for your problems...became friend for IT guys...soon to others...built trust. It's time for Google to encash that. That's what happenning.
In this competetive world, all innovations are bound for competition. I have no doubt to say another Google won't come. For us, it doesn't matter whether it's Google or Yahoo or someone else.

Andrew [PersonRank 0]

14 years ago #

Interesting! Now they have my calendar details as well. Now theres nowhere to hide.

jb [PersonRank 1]

14 years ago #

Kinda funny reading the post then seeing Google ads all over the site. :-)

PAStheLoD [PersonRank 1]

14 years ago #

Statistically Google is better than Microsoft, period :)
And I'd rather trust them than MS or Yahoo, or a no-name inc. just popped out of nothing, but wants my data.. IMHO :)

CJ Millisock [PersonRank 10]

14 years ago #

Like others have said, if you don't put your trust in Google for a given web service, you need to find another company to trust for that service, or just stop using the service altogether.

To me, it doesn't make sense to spread my loyalty out to numerous companies to "increase the chances of SOME of my data remaining out of the government's hands." I'd rather put all my eggs in one basket – the google basket – who has shown in the past that they're willing to hang on tight to my data. I think most of us use Google because they've EARNED our trust (besides the fact that they're more effective).

B42 [PersonRank 0]

14 years ago #

" It may be the devil or it may be the Lord, but you're gonna have to trust somebody"....

RT Deetew [PersonRank 0]

14 years ago #

I believe the lyrics are
"It may be the devil or it may be the Lord, but you're gonna have to serve somebody" – by Bob Dylan

Seems appropriate if you think about us as the digital herd, and google as the all-knowing shepherd.

AN [PersonRank 3]

14 years ago #

From the snippet in the article: >>If Google would publicly proclaim all that, no one would continue to use their services,<<

There's the rub--that's not true. People, by and large, don't care about that. Even smart people. I've seen it many times, I've spoken about it with people. And it's tempting, using all of those services is just too convenient.

CJ Millisock [PersonRank 10]

14 years ago #

Agreed, AN. I WANT Google to digist my information so they can send me ads for products that I WANT to buy. It's not like Google employees personally read our emails. It's all algorithmic.

Snowbeam [PersonRank 0]

14 years ago #

I think this comes down to the fact that google gets it and the rest don't or aren't quite there. Google doesn't ask me for my data per se. They try to get to know me and my habits and serve me according to that. The others try to pigeon hole or profile me as being of a specific type, age, gender, race, group, etc... Google sees that I like Jazz, hate rap, like R&B, enjoy some metal, rock, industrial and goth music and gives me what I might truly be interested in based on that. Microsoft, Yahoo, et all would ask me for my race and pigeon hole me in to only getting things that they believe my race would want to hear.

The answer is get to know me like a friend would and don't survey/profile me like a government entity or a pollster.

Philipp Lenssen [PersonRank 10]

14 years ago #

But I think the best thing is to not spread the same kind of data too much. For example, given two book stores I prefer to shop at Amazon simply because they already have my credit card infos. When I spread my data to a dozen services, isn't there a higher chance one of them has an unsecure server, or is passing on my data to third parties with unsecure services (or spam politics)?

AN writes
> And it's tempting, using all of those services
> is just too convenient.

Agreed – if I need to choose between privacy and convenience, I'd probably go for convenience. If Google wants to read my Gmails, OK, they can go ahead. I'm flattered they care so much, but I don't think they do because there's no commercial reason for them, I think. But it's a different issue if the gov't turns evil around and subpoenas the IT company. That can be dangerous – even with Google (who explicitly say they will follow local laws when it comes to passing on your data).

Grant Cruickshank [PersonRank 0]

14 years ago #

This article raises important questions (finally!) about one of the most data-intensive corporations in the world. Using the US as an example, personal Rights and Freedoms are protected by a written constitution and when they are under threat, Americans fight tooth and claw to protect them. But Google comes along, winks, smiles and says "Hey, we're the good guys, you can trust us!" and everyone who uses their services smiles back – "Aww, isn't that nice!" – and ignores the fact they have no clear privacy policy? Talk about blind stupidity.

Personally, I won't use them because I simply don't trust them: they've not given me adequate assurances that my data will not be abused: past behaviour is not enough, there are many things they could be hiding very easily because no-one seems to be asking the questions that need asked. And for those who feel their services are "too convenient" to do without? What are you, an addict? There are many ways of enjoying the internet WITHOUT Google.

ki85squared [PersonRank 0]

14 years ago #

This story is nothing but hype. Did anyone think to look at or mention Google's Privacy Policy?

google.com/privacypolicy.html

In the sections "Choices for Personal Information" and "Information Sharing," Google clearly states that it will not share personal information that you provide unless you give your consent or it's mandated by law.

If you're complaining about Google turning over information to the government, think about two things. 1) They had a reason to turn it over: you've been a naughty boy. If there's a warrant out for you and/or your information, the po-po has a right to have it. 2) The government already has a crapload of information on you already. Do you think they really care about / don't already know your Google username and password?

In terms of Google tracking what its users do: That is no different than a resort using video surveillance to track where its customers go. I live in Vegas, and I know that every big resorts has so many video cameras installed that they can track your every movement from the time you walk in until the time you walk out. Companies, for both security and statistical reasons, have a right to monitor what its customers do on their property. Any company that doesn't monitor what their customers do is flat-out foolish.

Until I hear that Google as a company has seriously abused an individual's personal information from a CREDIBLE source, I will trust them.

merlinvicki [PersonRank 0]

14 years ago #

Quote>>
"Until I hear that Google as a company has seriously abused an individual's personal information from a CREDIBLE source, I will trust them."

Lot of hype about nothing. What's the security that some other provider will not violate your privacy. Why do we question only Google. Probably because its become so big that we can take potshots at it.

I remember a movie called "The Time Machine (2002)" It had conceptualised a very kewl search buddy kinda thing. If we can have something like that in near future....I bet it has to come from Google.

Craig Cockburn [PersonRank 0]

14 years ago #

The time has come for an open source search engine to challenge Google. Firefox challenged the giant that is Microsoft. It can be done.

Only when search is entirely open source will we know what happens to our data.

Craig

MRobles [PersonRank 0]

14 years ago #

I wasn't a regular Google user until a few mothns ago. They gained my confidence based on a lot of good integrated services (Blogger did play a major role on my decision), good service quality and maintaining a low profie (no Yahoo's-like big ads, for instance). They did their job, built confidence and managed to acquired me as a new active user.

otis spunky [PersonRank 0]

14 years ago #

I am confused. if i dont use gmail... how does google read my emails?

Philipp Lenssen [PersonRank 10]

14 years ago #

> If you're complaining about Google turning over
> information to the government, think about two
> things. 1) They had a reason to turn it over: you've
> been a naughty boy.

Hmm. What if the gov't stops being trustworthy and convicts good boys, not just naughty boys? Much private information in the hands of any company can pose a danger. I'm not saying that this in argument against using such technology, but we should at least be aware of it to make rational decisions. Too much information in the hands of Yahoo in China landed some dissidents in jail, and I don't think free speech is being naughty. A more crass example of when information can be dangerous is that in those countries during Nazi terror in Europe where the gov't stored information on the people's religion, more people of Jewish faith were killed... because the data got in the wrong hands (of Nazis). The original evil here is not the act of storing the information, but that of requesting it or using it for the wrong reasons, of course... but we should still be aware of the potential dangers.

János Pásztor [PersonRank 0]

14 years ago #

I for one am particularly unhappy with Google Analytics. It uses JavaScript, which I really don't like to use unless absolutely necessary and there is no way to do the stuff serverside that could be done server side.

Philipp Lenssen [PersonRank 10]

14 years ago #

I guess a server-side way to do it would be to add an image. But then is it still possible to show screen resolution and such?

This thread is locked as it's old... but you can create a new thread in the forum. 

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