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Think Before You Post (Videos)  (View post)

James Xuan [PersonRank 10]

Wednesday, June 6, 2007
12 years ago7,306 views

I like them. I think they are good. My potatoes croquets are tasty with gravy like right now

Stuk [PersonRank 1]

12 years ago #

Hehe, they're awesome.

Martin Porcheron [PersonRank 10]

12 years ago #

Good message and definitly one a lot of young people (mid-teens) should take note of (heh, when I say young – I mean people my age). People often get carried away on sites like MySpace and Facebook and do things they later regret.

Travis Harris [PersonRank 10]

12 years ago #

Those are actually quite good I think... Hope to see them pushed a lot...

Travis Harris [PersonRank 10]

12 years ago #

Dig Link? :)

Freddy [PersonRank 0]

12 years ago #

digg.com/videos/comedy/PSA_Tri ...
The first video.

Jan De Messemaeker [PersonRank 1]

12 years ago #

They are indeed amazing!

That digg-link Freddy provided makes it look like this is something bad

"PSA Tries to Scare Kids Posting Their Pics Online

A public service announcement warning kids not to post their photos online."

while the message clearly says that you have to look out what you post on the internet. Not just "DONT DO IT!"

jim's tips [PersonRank 1]

12 years ago #

Those are excellent ads. They hit kinda close to home, because a friend of mine had some less-than flattering pictures posted on the 'net by her ex a few years ago, and she's still haunted by them today. The Internet has lots to offer, but "thinking first" is certainly the best motto to live by while online.

Nuno Mira [PersonRank 1]

12 years ago #

The videos are great, and so is the message they transmit.

Definitely an important point in everyone's education these days.

Travis Harris [PersonRank 10]

12 years ago #

digg.com/videos/people/You_Can ...

Johnny Sutherland [PersonRank 1]

12 years ago #

Excellent – they get the message across very clearly.

David T [PersonRank 7]

12 years ago #

These are good yeah.

Jennifer [PersonRank 0]

12 years ago #

I like them. I don't really follow them. I sort of post a lot of things. I do try to be safe though and only post after the fact, but I should be less revealing....my site wouldn't be the same if I were though, so it is a double edged sword.

Roger Browne [PersonRank 10]

12 years ago #

I don't like the ads. It's putting disturbing thoughts into teenagers minds. It's not the teenagers that need to change; it's society. We need to get to the point where it's no big deal that one's past is online. It's the past, alright?

The best way to get to that point is probably to let kids post as much as they like, till the internet is so flooded with blogs and pics that it doesn't matter anymore.

For example, a guy in the first video asks Sarah what colour underwear she is wearing. It's only a big deal because underwear is still a (slightly) taboo subject in today's society. But if everyone posted a log stating the colour of their underwear every day, it would cease to be interesting – even to underwear perverts.

PS: Mine's dark blue today.

TOMHTML [PersonRank 10]

12 years ago #

Never think. Just do it.
This is my motto.

Veky [PersonRank 10]

12 years ago #

Roger, there is a _reason_ why some things should not be made public on a wide scale. (And there is probably a good reason for many things that are taboo, though that might be less clear in this culture mix we live in.) Humans are animalistic for the pretty big part, and you don't want to be the target of hidden desires of the more reckless part of society. Of course, if "everybody" would post, the risk for any concrete individual would be smaller, but collective risk would be far greater. Do we really want such a civilization?

(I meant the voluntary posting. If suddenly our lives would become much more transparent without our permission (including the perverts' lives), the societal dynamic would be different and more complicated. For one view at that, read "Light of other days" by A. Clarke.;)

David Hetfield [PersonRank 10]

12 years ago #

Nice videos...

Thanks for sharing Philipp :)

DPic [PersonRank 10]

12 years ago #

I thought they were a joke until i saw ad council at the end.

James Xuan [PersonRank 10]

12 years ago #

[put at-character here]Rodger

Mine are Green Camouflage Boxers with Dark Green elastic

Tony Ruscoe [PersonRank 10]

12 years ago #

<< For example, a guy in the first video asks Sarah what colour underwear she is wearing. >>

I'm assuming he was asking because he'd seen a picture of her in just her underwear. In which case, wouldn't a better message to kids be that they shouldn't allow anyone (including themselves) to take pictures of them in just their underwear (or less)?

<< underwear perverts >>

And I assume you mean *actual* underwear perverts rather than superheroes? ;-)
blogoscoped.com/archive/2006-0 ...

Colin Colehour [PersonRank 10]

12 years ago #

These should be on the front page of sites like Myspace.

ShellehS [PersonRank 5]

12 years ago #

and, of cuz “Think Before your Comments”

Janitor [PersonRank 0]

12 years ago #

It's just more anti-janitor propaganda that's what it is.

Mike [PersonRank 0]

12 years ago #

These are good – as you know, we as a society need to be told what to do. Since parents are unable to raise children, it's very important that the media do the job for them, will help to instill fear into the populace at a young age. It will also teach them to respect what they hear on television. This way we raise a society of complacent consumers. "Fear this. Buy This. Vote for this. Kill this. Because we tell you to."

The hidden subtext – "Don't worry, *we'll* will tell you what to be afraid of, just listen to your television" keeps the populace docile and childlike. That can only be good for the future, right? That's what we want our kids doing, listening to every stranger who can afford airtime, right?

Seriously, I don't disagree with the message. I think it's every parent's responsibility to teach their kids these lessons. The *parents*. And the media's responsibility is to STAY THE HELL AWAY FROM RAISING OUR CHILDREN FOR US. We'll see to our kids' minds, and their safety and education, thank you very much.

TheRaveN 2.0 [PersonRank 1]

12 years ago #

Awesome!

jim's tips [PersonRank 1]

12 years ago #

[put at-character here]Roger
Teaching responsibility and accountability sometimes means putting a few disturbing thoughts into teens' minds. It's called growing up. Society can only change if our youth are given the proper tools to institute change. Establishing good ethics and morals, and instilling responsibility and accountability provides the groundwork to change that is beneficial to society instead of being self-serving.

[put at-character here]Mike
That presumes, of course, that parents take an active role in teaching their kids. You and many others may be excellent parents, but just take a walk around any school or mall, and you'll see the results of many parents who simply don't care.

Don Danz [PersonRank 1]

12 years ago #

Sighhhh...sadly necessary in a society where parents no longer parent.

As long as they don't make public service messages teaching skateboarders to wear pads and helmets and to not let their friends film them...then it's all good.

Ayf [PersonRank 0]

12 years ago #

Only comment,they are too long.
Agree that the media is the BIGGEST teacher today. Non of us can escaped by the "education" by TV, advertising, these kinds of media.The media is out of control, the education is out of control. The future – out of control.

Ninth Life [PersonRank 0]

12 years ago #

These messages are more for parents than their kids, really. That's good, because most social networks are not really truthful about their actual content and members. Yahoo and others constantly lie and hide the truth about all that goes on, otherwise parents wouldn't let their kids use them as much. They all seem like happy family places on the surface, right? These companies wrongly wrap themselves in The Constitution to knowingly put kids in harms way through exploitation, as they place them in direct contact with openly active predators and pedophiles. Meanwhile, the American Library Association and even thousands of teachers themselves, protect perverts and promote these things, pushing their political agendas against things like DOPA, at the price of kids' innocence and safety. The chilling effect on them is probably the cold grip of death nearby, more than anybody banning Mark Twain, or something so terrible as that which these tax paid educators and librarians fear most. The messages show how nobody can be trusted, especially those coaches and tattoo wearing blue collar workers, apparently. Truth is, we really should be checking national registered predator lists against those of teachers themselves at this point. None of them seem to really care enough about what happens to kids under their supervision and just blame the parents too. Nice mentorship.

Paperspirit [PersonRank 0]

12 years ago #

The idea of "be careful what you post" is a good message.

What bothers me is the sub-message that creepy people do things like wipe tables, mop floors, and take tickets. What, guys in suits and ties aren't going to be looking at Sarah's underwear blog and asking her about it?

Kids, remember, you can tell the creeps by what they look like and what job they do!

Roger Browne [PersonRank 10]

12 years ago #

The ads work both ways of course.

The "forward" way is to put the idea into the minds of teenagers that they are surrounded by creepy people who will be drooling over their blog posts and online photos.

The "reverse" way is to put the idea into the minds of creepy people that they should be googling and voyeuristically drooling over stuff posted by hot teenagers who they encounter in their daily work.

The ads are really well made, but I don't think screening them is a public service.

Fed Up [PersonRank 0]

12 years ago #

They do seem to be more about inducing both a sense of paranoia and instilling deviant role models than simply addressing the situation directly. But that is the traditional government approach in dealing with any problem isn't it? Instead of going right to the corporations that make millions off the networking of predators, they set up their own committees to milk the situation. These "wars on" whatever sells are the perfect vehicle for endless pork laden earmarks over the years. More manufactured security needs being sold on fear and loathing. Not that the threats don't really exist now. Our gov and corps like Yahoo makes sure of that, keeping the supply of monsters full. Only this time, they've enlisted the help of not only NAMBLA loving ALCU liberal freedom nuts, they have the parents in a frenzy now over the creeps run amok in an unrestricted YahooGoogle profit race. Works the same for drugs, ID theft, even terrorism. Make a mess and then charge big bucks to clean it up, like some evil janitor. Kids should be just as worried about these online marketers that groom them the same way as the predators they host, stealing their personal info, selling it to the highest bidder and the NSA too, of course.

xizr [PersonRank 0]

12 years ago #

Great!

I saw erotic photos of my female school-friend posted in the interenet!

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